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There are many languages around the world and some of them have very few native speakers, one of these languages is actually a European language called Rumantsch Grischun from Switzerland. it is spoken by 50-70,000 people in the Swiss canton of Grisons (Graubünden) and is one of the four national languages of Switzerland with semi-official status.

Though a language it is probably better described as a cluster of closely-related dialects. The standardised written form was created in 1982 by Heinrich Schmid, a linguist from Zurich. Romansh first appeared in print in 1552. A Romansh translation of the New Testament was published in 1560.

Why am i blogging about this language? Well as you can see from the photograph we have had several titles published in Rumantsch Grischun including the following characters from The Little Lights series: Amy Carmichael; Corrie ten Boom; George Mueller; David Livingstone and Hudson Taylor.

More recently we’ve had several colouring and activity books done.

The Special Birthday dot to dot book and several characters from the Bible Heroes series: Mary, Peter, Elijah, Gideon.

Previously the same publishing company did Joseph, Noah and Ruth as well as two dot to dot books on Creation and Miracles.

If you would like to see these books in English follow the links below. This is just another encouraging example of how God is at work across the world in places and languages we may not even have heard of.

Bible Heroes: http://www.christianfocus.com/search/do/-/-/n_t?term=bible+heroes&type=all

Dot to Dot: http://www.christianfocus.com/search/do/-/-/n_t?term=dot+to+dot&type=all

Little Lights: http://www.christianfocus.com/series/show/36/-/s_s_1

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One response »

  1. That’s pretty cool! The first time I heard about that language was from a Swede in 1986 when my family and I were visiting Europe. Because I had a fascination with languages (in spite of only ever becoming fluent in English–and pretty close to fluent in French for a while), I immediately wanted to learn it–and then never really heard about it again. Until today!

    Reply

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